Workout with a Buddy

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Having a training partner can mean the difference between success and failure when it comes to your fitness goals. Unless you’re consistently a highly motivated self-starter, your chances of sticking to a long-term fitness plan without a partner are significantly lower than they are with a partner.According to research working out with friends is better than exercising alone.A study of 1,000 women found that 64 per cent of those who run, go to the gym or attend group exercise classes with friends will push themselves harder than if they went alone.The study shows 31 per cent of women consider their friends to be the motivation they need to stay in good shape.


BENEFITS OF A TRAINING PARTNER

The Time Goes by Faster

Working out with a friend or family member can make your workout time go by much more quickly. When you’re able to chat with a workout partner and catch up on each other’s lives as you exercise, the time will fly by and become an occasion to which you can look forward.

You Won’t Cancel a Workout

When you answer to no one but yourself, it can become a habit to cancel a workout after a long, busy day because you feel tired or because you feel that it’s a waste of time. You may think that canceling one workout won’t hurt you, but if you cancel even one session, it can be more difficult to get back into the habit because you may decrease your endurance. If your workout partner is counting on you to be there for an exercise session, you’ll be less likely to cancel.

Your workouts can be more fun

News flash: The treadmill and the bench press aren’t the most exciting ways to pass the time. With a partner, you can get your heart racing in more interesting ways (yes, we’re still talking about the gym). Together, you can play one-on-one basketball, tennis and squash. “You can also take turns leading new exercises and switching up the routine,” suggests Stonehouse. Maybe you know a brutal leg lunge that you used to do on your own? Teach it to your buddy one day, and the next, let him teach you something new. “Your body adapts and becomes efficient at moves that you’ve done again and again,” says Stonehouse. “The more you change up your workout, the better your body is going to respond.”

You’ll work out harder

“Whenever you’re working out with someone else, the intensity is always going to be great than when you’re alone,” points out Stonehouse. (You don’t want to be the weak one who can’t keep up with a seven-minutes mile!) One key tip when picking your partner: Your athletic abilities should be in the same ballpark

You’ll always have a spotter

Never again will you have to approach a random meathead and ask him to spot you. Never again will you have to count your own reps. Use your spotter to keep an eye on your form as you work, too.

You’ll Be Bolstered by Outside Perspective

It’s difficult to view yourself objectively. When it comes to your fitness progress, you may not notice how your strength and endurance is improving or that you’ve lost weight or gained muscle tone over time. Your partner can view you more objectively and remind you of your progress so far. Having that validation can help bolster your self-esteem and keep your motivation levels high.

You Can Celebrate Your Successes

Celebrating your progress alone isn’t as much fun as it is with a partner. You and your partner can set goals for yourselves and celebrate every few weeks after you’ve met those goals. Take a night off from work and stress and celebrate at the movies or a bar or at a mall.Of course, there is the possibility that your workout partner can be a negative influence on your fitness progress if you choose someone who doesn’t respond to your encouragement, belittles your progress and won’t commit. Search until you find a competent, positive partner for your fitness regimen.

Your friends will be thinner

Before you judge us, we’re not being totally shallow here—having thin friends is for your own good. Researchers at Harvard University found that you can “catch” obesity (along with smoking habits and happiness) because it spreads like an infectious disease. The experts found that a person’s risk of becoming obese rises by two percent for every five obese social contacts they have. “There’s definitely some truth to that,” agrees Stonehouse. “If you’re surrounded by people who are active and eat well, there’s a good chance you’re going to do the same.

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